Turmeric may help in the treatment of breast cancer: Research

News Women's Health

The intention is to determine whether the spice may effectively lessen joint pain in breast cancer patients and whether it enhances their quality of life.

Oral oestrogen blockers are used to treat hormonally-driven breast cancer, which accounts for about 70% of cases. But because the drugs can cause joint discomfort, many women quit taking them, which puts them at a higher risk of relapsing.

The UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center will use a $50,000 grant from the Safeway Foundation to study how South Asian spice turmeric can help breast cancer patients using anti-estrogen medications with joint pain.

According to Mili Arora, an associate professor of haematology and oncology at UC Davis, “This gift will have a great influence on our programme.” We express our gratitude to the Safeway Foundation for helping us in our mission to support breast cancer patients in living their lives to the fullest.

Some people with arthritis claim that turmeric, a flowering plant from the ginger family, lessens their joint pain. The Safeway Foundation award will assist UC Davis in testing the administration of turmeric in tablet form and oral anti-estrogen medications. The intention is to determine whether the spice may effectively lessen joint pain in breast cancer patients and whether it enhances their quality of life.

“Supporting the efforts of the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center is an honour. The cancer centre is a prime example of the kind of organisations that go above and beyond to assist people that we learn about every day,” said Wendy Gutshall, Safeway’s director of public affairs.

The research will enable Dr. Arora and her team to offer crucial information to breast cancer patients on the efficacy and safety of combining turmeric with oral anti-oestrogen therapy.

The Central Valley and inland Northern California, with more than 6 million residents, are served by the only National Cancer Institute-designated centre, the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center. More than 15,000 adults and children receive compassionate, thorough treatment from its doctors each year, and they have access to more than 150 ongoing clinical trials at any given time.

More than 225 scientists from UC Davis are involved in its creative research initiative, which advances the development of new cancer diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Patients can receive cutting-edge medical care, including immunotherapy and other specialised therapies.

The cancer centre offers thorough education and workforce development programmes for the upcoming generation of doctors and scientists. Its Community Outreach and Engagement Office targets inequities in cancer outcomes across many communities.

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