diabetes women

Controlling diabetes in women will protect future generations

Diabetes News

Doctors talked about how diabetes affects women differently than it does men, how diabetes affects women’s obesity and PCOD, how diabetes affects marriage, how diabetes affects women’s sexual health, and how to manage diabetes while pregnant.

Nagpur: In India, two out of every five diabetic women are in their prime life. The likelihood of their future children having diabetes will significantly decrease if they manage their diabetes after receiving pre-conception care. Pre-conception care that is carefully thought out could prevent a generation from inheriting diabetes from their parents, according to Dr. Sunil Gupta, a diabetologist and national president of the Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group of India (DIPSI).

On November 14, World Diabetes Day, Dr Sunil Gupta organized a conclave on “Diabetes in Women” in lieu of “Hello Diabetes” an initiative in which expert doctors from various fields took part in an open forum and discussed multiple aspects of diabetes in women.

“Education to Protect Tomorrow” is the theme for World Diabetes Day in 2022. We can educate society by educating women. A woman has the power to influence her family, culture, community, and future generations; thus, Dr. Gupta said, equipping women with knowledge can help keep families and society healthy.

Doctors talked about how diabetes affects women differently than it does in men, how diabetes affects women’s obesity and PCOD, how diabetes affects marriage, how diabetes affects women’s sexual health, and how to manage diabetes while pregnant.

The most crucial topic was how women could protect future generations from diabetes and related diseases. In India, unplanned pregnancies account for over 90% of all births. According to gynaecologist Dr. Meghna Agrawal, women are denied pre-conception care. She also said that as women get older to get married and have children, their lifestyles change, and they become more vulnerable to gestational diabetes.

Dr. Sudhir Bhave, a psychiatrist, discussed stress-related diabetes in women and provided some insightful advice on managing stress in daily life. Dietician Dr. Kavita Gupta and breast cancer awareness activist Dr. Rohini Patil discussed aspects of their respective fields. This initiative held at IMA Hall had the support of at least 15 women’s organizations in Nagpur. The event drew more than 400 female attendees.

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